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Trigonometry of the ancient: were they more intelligent?

Posted: Mon Feb 10, 2020 6:46 pm
by Mildir
I was always fascinated by the possibility that in ancient times there might have existed individuals more intelligent or gifted than modern scholars and researchers (also because this might mean our life system restrains the natural expansion of the intellect).
My entire gnostic experience led me to be sure that they did exist and there was plenty of them.
Might this be a piece of evidence? :hmm:

https://www.distractify.com/omg/2017/08 ... Q4uM6Tq2Sc

Re: Trigonometry of the ancient: were they more intelligent?

Posted: Wed Feb 19, 2020 9:44 am
by Meneldur Olvarion
Mildir wrote:
Mon Feb 10, 2020 6:46 pm
[...] My entire gnostic experience led me to be sure that they did exist and there was plenty of them.
I'd agree with that. I think what happens is that cultures undergo expansion and decline phases, and since humans don't live very long in relation to the lifespans of cultures, they tend to not pass on information during the decline phase, so technology gets lost. You can see this dramatically if you compare U.S. High School essays from the 1910's with those of the 2010's. The 1910's essays make the current ones seem almost the productions of intellectually challenged people, except for a few high quality outliers that occur in any culture.

Addendum: What the article is talking about is what we might call the 'original' definition of trigonometric functions vs the modern functional definition. For example, for the tangent, we have the original:

https://www.mathopenref.com/trigtangent.html

and the Modern functional:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tangent#Equations

The first uses simple division, whereas the functional uses differential equations. The functional form is more powerful if you understand what is going on, and the technique can also be applied to other functions so you get an idea of how they interrelate. OTOH, the original version is a lot easier to calculate! (Most people use symbolic math programs like Mathematica to manipulate differential equations, although you can do them by hand if you are a masochist ;) ).

Re: Trigonometry of the ancient: were they more intelligent?

Posted: Wed Feb 19, 2020 1:00 pm
by wornout
Hi,

I just thought that I would jump in and just state that the winners of any war controls the recorded history thereafter for their advantage, thus recent discoveries are starting to shed light upon this fact.

The general population, who are just trying to live, are trusting the powers that be to lead them in the right direction after the war conflict.

The end result, the elite on both sides keep the true knowledge for themselves in order to control the minds of the masses, who have been dumbed down over time, i.e. the 1910's essays that you gave as an example above.

Any older literature of the past, by my experience is truly much more difficult to understand, all due to the public education that I did receive in the past. I have had to truly work at it to gain the understanding that I have in the present.

Re: Trigonometry of the ancient: were they more intelligent?

Posted: Wed Feb 19, 2020 3:32 pm
by Mildir
Your observations are smarter than any thought I could have come up with, they definitely make me feel like a sample of "culture in the decline phase"... :D

Re: Trigonometry of the ancient: were they more intelligent?

Posted: Wed Feb 19, 2020 5:37 pm
by wornout
Hi Mildir,

I do thank you for the compliment. It came from a lot of independent thinking on my own & work (reading) and listening to other peoples views i.e. shortwave radio, before the advent of the internet. :read:

I am very impressed with yours and Meneldur's discussion. :)

Yes, we are in a declining stage. :(