The Death-Eaters

Poetical expressions of facets of the spirit of Ilsaluntë Valion.
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Eadhastar

The Death-Eaters

Post by Eadhastar » Tue Apr 29, 2008 5:27 pm

A very strange poem I wrote during a semi-trance state. Ironically, it makes sense to me now.

Corcorina:

Sisters, come and eat with me
the bones of life, the bones of trees,
let us feast on birth to come,
dancing in the moonlit sun,
the sun that wavers in my eyes,
the sun that whispers long goodbyes.

Peranta:

Sisters, come and eat with me
the flesh of strife long in disease,
let us feast so birth may come,
falling through the faceless sun,
the sun that welcomes on her knees
the sons of all each dream decrees.

Urlissa:

Sisters, come and eat with me
the blood of ripeness in the bees,
let us feast on birth new come,
meeting breath in body's sun,
the sun that longs for open skies
to ride the winds, once more--to fly.

Eadhastar

Re: The Death-Eaters

Post by Eadhastar » Tue Apr 29, 2008 5:31 pm

Oh the names come from Quenya:

Corcorina: "Crow-crowned"--referring to the Raven qualities associated with the Irish Morrighan
Peranta: "Half-faced"--referring to the half living, half dead face of the Norse Hel
Urlissa: "Honey-Sun"--referring to the birthing qualities of Brighid and other similar sun/bee goddesses

Looking back, I think the poem shows death as a three-fold phase ... moving from disintegration to a threshold kind of rest or reprieve or change and then moving towards reintegration again, rebirth.

And when I read the "sun" as the "soul" ... it is a lot less nonsensical than I first thought!

Hostawen

Re: The Death-Eaters

Post by Hostawen » Tue Apr 29, 2008 10:29 pm

Absolutely love this, reminds me much of the Norns or Fates. I didn't find any of it nonsensical, makes perfect sense to me.

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Eruannlass
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Re: The Death-Eaters

Post by Eruannlass » Sat May 17, 2008 4:07 pm

This brings to mind the chapter in 'Women Who Run With the Wolves' called 'Singing over the Bones.'  The story is a bit different from your poem, but you might want to find the book and read it.  It's easy to find...
http://homestar.org/bryannan/estes.html
                                                                          Eruannlass
I Aear cân ven na mar ~ 'The Sea calls us Home.'

For whatever we lose (like a you or a me)
it's always ourselves we find in the sea
~ e e cummings

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Lomelindo*
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Re: The Death-Eaters

Post by Lomelindo* » Sat May 17, 2008 8:51 pm

This is beautiful.
"He that breaks a thing to find out what it is has left the path of wisdom."

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