The Blue Ridge aerosol and its relation to Salvinorin

as long as it's about gnosis
Post Reply
User avatar
Meneldur Olvarion
First Mate
First Mate
Posts: 1401
Joined: Mon Dec 24, 2007 5:23 am
Location: Blue Ridge Mountains, Georgia
Contact:

The Blue Ridge aerosol and its relation to Salvinorin

Post by Meneldur Olvarion » Sat May 04, 2013 5:17 pm

This post grew out f a private email discussion about the location of the house we are in the process of purchasing in the Blue Ridge Mountains of North Georgia. My friend Mike found it 'fascinating', so I thought I'd post it here. The discussion opens with Luthien's question:
Luthien wrote:I was wondering, are those Blue Ridge Mountains the same ones as in that song "the Trail of the Lonesome Pine" ?

Yes. From the Blue Ridge Wiki:
Blue Ridge Wiki wrote:[...] The mountain range is located in the eastern United States, starting at its southernmost portion in Georgia, then ending northward in Pennsylvania. To the west of the Blue Ridge, between it and the bulk of the Appalachians, lies the Great Appalachian Valley, bordered on the west by the Ridge and Valley province of the Appalachian range. The Blue Ridge Mountains are noted for their bluish color when seen from a distance. Trees put the "blue" in Blue Ridge, from the isoprene released into the atmosphere, thereby contributing to the characteristic haze on the mountains and their distinctive color.
[link]

[...] Trees put the "blue" in Blue Ridge, from the isoprene released into the atmosphere,
This excerpt from the Blue Ridge Wiki is interesting because Salvinorin-A is composed of 4 isoprene units:
The Kappa Opioid Agonist, Salvinorin A, Attenuates Locomotor Effects of Morphine but not Morphine-Induced Conditioned Place Preference wrote:[...]Once extracted, unlike other known hallucinogens (i.e., N,/V-dimethyltryptamine, psilocybin, mescaline, lysergic acid diethylamide, or ketamine), salvinorin A does not contain a nitrogen atom and thus is not categorized as an alkaloid (Roth et al., 2002).Instead, salvinorin A is considered a neoclerodane diterpene: a bicyclicorganic compound composed of four isoprene units.
[link to PDF]

Now, although isoprene in itself has no psychotropic properties (that I'm aware of), it may be that because I'm sensitized to Salvinorin that I also am beneficially affected by the isoprene aerosols, which are produced more in the warmer months as a strategy by many plants to "flatten out" the high and low daily temperature variation curve (you can read more about that in the isoprene Wiki). I can tell you subjectively that I feel much better in a bioregion like this, and on particularly warm days, the feeling is akin to the very early stages of a Salvia trip (but never goes beyond that -- or else all of the North Georgians would be driving their cars off the roads and walking dreamily off cliffs ;) ).

The identification of the blue aerosol is new research, though, so its not surprising that I never saw it before. Back in the day, they would gloss over it as "an effect of transpiration". Well, duh! But, it's nice to know the actual compound and its relation to things I'm more directly familiar with.

User avatar
Lúthien
Captain
Captain
Posts: 1562
Joined: Fri Jun 27, 2008 5:52 am
Location: the Netherlands
Contact:

Re: The Blue Ridge aerosol and its relation to Salvinorin

Post by Lúthien » Sat May 04, 2013 7:35 pm

Well that is interesting! I would have thought "it's just a name" - all the more because many mountain ranges have a bluish hue seen from the distance for the same reason as why the sky is blue (which is that the air scatters blue light more than red).

But these mountains are then probably more blue than on average!

It's a bit as with the name of say - the Red Sea or the Black Sea ... I suppose there are also mountain ranges that have other colour names but I'm not sure. Of course Ered Luin springs to mind - Middle Earth's Blue Ridge Mountain range :)

Somehow I never expected those to actually have the colour that they are named after. That maybe the one who gave them that name saw them in very particular circumstances (red algae bloom?) or may have had other reasons for using that particular name ... I could think of many reasons.

The isoprene link is also interesting. I also feel much better when I'm in a forest but I do t know if that's more a psychological or a more physical effect - or a combination such as the good effect that smelling the forest air has. Probably there's also a physical quality of the air in a forest that makes it more wholesome - it could even be the net overall electrical charge of the airborne droplets or what's all in there, or indeed compounds such as that isoprene. Or the birdsong even.
Or the fact that being in nature is more likely to open you up to the imaginal - who knows? (Couldn't help thinking of that the borders of Fairie in Smith of Wootton-Major are somewhere in the forests)

Anyhow, it's good to live among trees!

User avatar
Meneldur Olvarion
First Mate
First Mate
Posts: 1401
Joined: Mon Dec 24, 2007 5:23 am
Location: Blue Ridge Mountains, Georgia
Contact:

Re: The Blue Ridge aerosol and its relation to Salvinorin

Post by Meneldur Olvarion » Sat May 04, 2013 8:41 pm

Lúthien wrote:Well that is interesting! I would have thought "it's just a name" - all the more because many mountain ranges have a bluish hue seen from the distance for the same reason as why the sky is blue (which is that the air scatters blue light more than red).
True. but in some mountain ranges, for example the Blue Ridge Mountains here in North America, and the Australian Blue Mountains produce more isoprene than normal -- enough to change the spectral qualities of the air near the ground. It seems to be more effective in a high humidity environment as obtains in these ranges, in which it can easily be perceived as a haze or light smoke (which some people misidentify as human-caused pollution).

The following article explains how isoprene helps protect the plant chloroplasts from damage via heat stress, which they have a danger of getting in these subtropical latitudes. [link]
But these mountains are then probably more blue than on average!
Yes, I've actually seen this myself in comparison with forests in, say, the Pacific Northwest of North America (where I was born).
The isoprene link is also interesting. I also feel much better when I'm in a forest but I do t know if that's more a psychological or a more physical effect - or a combination such as the good effect that smelling the forest air has. Probably there's also a physical quality of the air in a forest that makes it more wholesome - it could even be the net overall electrical charge of the airborne droplets or what's all in there, or indeed compounds such as that isoprene. Or the birdsong even.
Or the fact that being in nature is more likely to open you up to the imaginal - who knows? (Couldn't help thinking of that the borders of Fairie in Smith of Wootton-Major are somewhere in the forests)

Anyhow, it's good to live among trees!
Yes, exactly! :-)

User avatar
Ginnie
Seaman (Experienced poster)
Seaman (<i>Experienced poster</i>)
Posts: 89
Joined: Thu Jun 23, 2011 9:07 am

Re: The Blue Ridge aerosol and its relation to Salvinorin

Post by Ginnie » Sat May 04, 2013 10:13 pm

I had to go look at pics of these blue mountains. Simply stunning! And, yes, get me in a forest or near water and somehow I feel awesome!

User avatar
Lúthien
Captain
Captain
Posts: 1562
Joined: Fri Jun 27, 2008 5:52 am
Location: the Netherlands
Contact:

Re: The Blue Ridge aerosol and its relation to Salvinorin

Post by Lúthien » Sun May 05, 2013 1:33 am

It is odd that I just thought about how similar this subject is to something that I was thinking about the past days.
It's this: I am editing a little video that Susanne and two of her soccer team mates had thought up: it's for their annual weekend away, where they have one evening on which everyone (in groups of three) is doing something funny. The theme this year was "make a tourism brochure / presentation / video" for a given country. They chose Greece.
So they wrote a silly little story with Plato, Socrates, Aristotle, Ajax, Achilles, a Siren and a Cyclops.
Anyhow, I wanted to make it look more like Greece: it had struck me before how different the colours are here than in other countries, especially around this time of year. It is as if everything has a greenish hue, and the contrast is quite low.
In Greece, but also in British Columbia, it had struck me how very blue everything is. Even pictures show that clearly.
When I had returned to the Netherlands in may 2008 this sensation of "how green everything is!" was particularly strong.

I think this may be related to several things: first, this delta landscape is purely sand and mud - no rock bottom anywhere. So everything is covered in either grass or weeds or trees - if it's not being built upon or a road. Also, for some reason all vegetation here seems to be of a very profound tint of green - in other countries I often see greyish or blueish hues of green - here, it's all one hue. Pure, undiluted, smack-in-your-face primary, hard green.
Also, there's a lot of surface water. The reflection of light on that water may very well soften the contrast - this sort of light was famous even among 17th century painters.
Plus the high air humidity may play a role - it's usually around 70-80% here.

In any case, the visible difference with other places is quite striking.
I wonder if this also influences how persons feel overall. I can't say it is particularly good or bad - I like the high-contrast, blueish tint of Greece and BC - but I feel ok here as well.

Eventually, I did use a colour correction on the video footage and set the contrast higher. It indeed gives quite a different feel: the shadows are now blueish, instead of dark grey. It looks warmer, too.

Post Reply

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest