Thinking in Pictures: Gnosticism and Autism

artists as contemporary mystics
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Broken_Mirror33
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Thinking in Pictures: Gnosticism and Autism

Post by Broken_Mirror33 » Tue Dec 25, 2018 4:02 pm

I have recently begun reading Temple Grandin's book: Thinking in Pictures - My Life with Autism. I started to think about how Gnosticism relates to autism. As a child, Temple realized her thought processes were different from most people--she thought in pictures. Autism has always been related to a high degree of visual-spatial intelligence, what might the effects of Gnosticism have on someone with autism?

My own opinion is that the ability to think in terms of myth and analyze relationships and human interactions on the basis of mythology would be a great benefit to someone with autism. Realize, autistics struggle with complex human emotions and recognizing the intentionality of others.

Let me hear someone else's thoughts on the matter, what do you guys think?

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Lucius
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Re: Thinking in Pictures: Gnosticism and Autism

Post by Lucius » Tue Jan 01, 2019 7:12 pm

My experience led me to the rule: do not think, do not imagine. Of course, it is almost impossible to do. But if you still get it, then you can "see" - some scenes like sleeping in reality.
The only problem is that these scenes are shown (by themselves or by someone intentionally) on a completely random topic. This is how to find random online video cameras on the Internet and watch them.
That is, you need to create an intention to see something you need. And it is quite difficult to do this without resorting to thoughts or fantasies. Not the brain, but the soul itself must wish to see something important for itself. It does not matter what your body is, it only matters how your soul is developed.
I want to say that any mental disorder in itself does not give advantages in the development of gnosis. The advantage is not in the body, but in the body's user.
If we consider gnosticism as auto-training, then maybe it will be able to help the body of an autistic person with something. But the gnostic philosophers did not set themselves such a goal. The mythology itself is needed in gnosticism only as a trigger for awakening.

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