The Faryel and their culture

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Mildir
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The Faryel and their culture

Post by Mildir »

So, as I previously explained here, the world where all my past life memories take place is called Ethilkânustaz, “External Region of Arda” (and the continent of Valinor is one of its four continents).
I think the time has come to talk about the other people who lives there, since I’ve only written about Eldar.
As I mentioned, a member of this people is called a Farya, more members are called Faryel (in their tongue).
The Faryel, as far as I know, were originally a group of Ainur (or “Spirits”) that didn’t want to partake in the great story sung by Eru, those who’d become the Valar and their hosts.
They saw Arda mostly as a play, an interesting place to visit, but were not as “emotionally bound” to it as other spirits.
Since the very beginning, they have been permitted to have more freedom than most of the other species as regards using the mind to manipulate reality, so they can “play” with the laws of the universe in a way that would make them seem gods to us.
But this came with a “price”: they cannot directly influence the evolutionary path of the children of Eru (Immortals and Men), because of their original decision not to partake in that path.
In a past where there was far less din on our planet, very small groups of them inhabited it: it is commonly known, among the Eldar of Valinor, that the ancestors of the Celts met some of them.
No one seems to know what happened exactly, but the men of that age were likely very impressed by these encounters (some Farya probably did something beyond some poor man’s comprehension), and a whole set of stories began to be told, which then would become myths and legends about one (and often more than one) people very fair to look at and with all sorts of magical abilities.
As the risk of actually influencing the evolutionary path of Men increased, all Faryel abandoned the planet and moved to Luxenor, one of the four continents of the Ethilkânustaz, which Manwë gave to them.
Interestingly enough, they instead never risked to alter the path of the Immortals, maybe due to a major understanding that these have of the universe, or because of their steadfast will to realize certain dreams in their own and unique way.
So you can see Faryel even in Tol Eressëa, at Vairë’s house, for example.
In my life as Mildir Nul-galad (or Mildo Nuldacal, in Quenya) I met many of them: it was always fascinating to bump into these little people, who looked like children even in the adult phase.
They weren’t like the Eldar and in fact I liked them a bit less: they never harm in any way, neither with facts nor with words, but they are… elusive!
Some of them just looked at me, remaining among trees, and then disappeared. Once I asked a question to one of them, it was an important question from my viewpoint, and the Farya simply kept staring at me without answering.
Then I turned my gaze away for a moment, a single moment, and when I looked at the Farya again they had disappeared.
I felt ignored, which never ever happened among Eldar.
On the other hand, I got to know Faryel who were EXTREMELY kind with me and were even willing to explain their culture, of which I shall write in detail soon, because it’s impressive.
They have a language of their own, called Farya, and they spend their time in ways that are incredible…
It was the union between some Faryel and some Men belonging to the first groups of the Atani that gave origin to the race of the Perindi, referred to as Halflings or Hobbits in Tolkien’s books.
This is probably why the entire people of the Halflings was bound to disappear from Middle-earth and its last representatives live now in a place of Valinor called Firth of Perindion (also Maura Labingi, the person who has inspired the character of Frodo Baggins in Tolkien’s books, if my memories are correct. He and his kin accepted to be made immortal, to be forever the living proof of the facts happened in the past, which they wanted to be remembered).
Anyway… let’s get back to the main topic!
This is exactly (and I mean exactly) what a Farya looks like:


Luxë.jpg
Our myths may be misguided, but they steer however shakily towards the true harbour, while materialistic 'progress' leads only to a yawning abyss and the Iron Crown of the power of evil. (J.R.R. Tolkien)
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Re: The Faryel and their culture

Post by Meneldur Olvarion »

Mildir wrote: Sat Feb 06, 2021 6:54 pm [...] In a past where there was far less din on our planet, very small groups of them inhabited it: it is commonly known, among the Eldar of Valinor, that the ancestors of the Celts met some of them.
No one seems to know what happened exactly, but the men of that age were likely very impressed by these encounters (some Farya probably did something beyond some poor man’s comprehension), and a whole set of stories began to be told, which then would become myths and legends about one (and often more than one) people very fair to look at and with all sorts of magical abilities.
This part reminds me of the Irish Mythological Cycle. I look forward to reading more of your material.
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Re: The Faryel and their culture

Post by Mildir »

So… the Farya culture (sorry for the long absence, but work kept me busy !) !
As I mentioned earlier, Luxenor is a land mostly covered by woods and most Faryel - this is important to keep in mind when looking at their habits - live among trees and under no house roof.
There are in any case some, such as those of a family I used to know, who live in rather small stone houses in front of lakes or on the tops of hills.
In their land, as well as in Valinor, climate is not an issue: rains are very moderate and, for many reasons, never wet the internal part of the tree foliage, where they often linger. The entire year is generally like an endless summery Spring and all the necessary food (though the Faryel’s necessities are far from being as strict as ours) can be found outside (but note that neither Eldar nor Faryel eat meat or fish, so I’m basically talking about fruits, some cereals and vegetables).
A curiosity: the fauna of Luxenor includes birds, little fishes, small rodents, badgers, deer and… the animal that we call Okapi !!
Luxenor is the only continent of the Ethilkânustaz where Okapis can be found, I don’t know why !
As you should have guessed, the Faryel can spend most of their time as they like, which they definitely do: they wander and observe, they create songs, poems and little objects. They explore their own mental abilities, study the nature of things near and far and - when they are adult - often explore other places and other dimensions of our universe by traveling with their mind.
Music plays a fundamental role in every Farya’s life: one of the most iconic habits of this people is indeed celebrating everything through singing.
They have songs specifically created to celebrate new discoveries, the beginning of a new love or of a particular story and they have songs to celebrate every single part of the day (these are in fact called “day songs”): the awakening, breakfast, the morning sun, all the meals…
During all their existence, they created at least one song for every possible event, even the smallest, such as an encounter between two friends.
These compositions also not seldom resemble what we call “nursery rhymes”.
I remember the beginning of one in particular: it is a “nursery rhyme” that two Faryel often “sing” after unexpectedly bumping into each other (especially if they were about to knock against each other).
The beginning sounds like this: Anore haana ! Anore heene ! Anore katumar andu sheene !
And of course (because this is much more natural for them than for any other people) they dance while “singing” it.

A very important thing about the Farya culture: when they don’t sing they rarely communicate by voice.
This happens for two reasons:
a) Communicating with the mind is an ability they have even as children, it is the most normal thing.
b) Their language… we’ve come to the moment that I must speak about it… their language was originally devised to be dreamt of only.
And preferably to be sung rather than spoken.
Why is that, you may ask ?

Every word in Farya can have different meanings: its meaning can depend on many factors, such as whether it’s told to a loved one or not, whether it’s placed in front of a word that evokes something smooth or not...
But what's most befuddling is that - if I understood correctly - the meaning of words can also depend on particular thoughts underlying them.
Thoughts that you can communicate only in shared dreams (by which I mean “visions”) or mental messages (which the Faryel consider a partial form of shared dreams).
Which is why spoken Farya is considered by all Faryel a “diminished” version of their tongue (plus they say that Farya should be sung because singing is the full natural communicating mode, whereas talking is an incomplete mode).
Farya is an impossible language, for beings who think like the Eldar: the most ancient among them compiled a Farya grammatical compendium of thirty-six books and it’s still considered basic knowledge.
It’s full of strange features, such as: “Na” is the word to say “For” (the preposition), but it becomes “Fui” if the noun that follows represents someone that the subject of the sentence loves.
Or also: words behave in ways not common to any other language. They can merge like this: Edòre ( = Heart) + Enòre ( = Spirit) > Endòre = “Heart and spirit” = “What one is and has inside”. And then: Sfiryo ( = Fire) + Endòre > Sfiryendòre = The condition in which you feel as if your entire inner self were aflame, because you are madly in love or because of something similar.
Or also: in certain parts of the speech, changing the accent of a word is a way to imply negation. E.g.: N’edòre na calasse (after a pause) = In the heart in order to harm > N’èdore na calasse (after a pause) = Not in the heart in order to harm.
Farya is the only tongue in which I’ve ever seen the so-called “specular sentences”, such as: “In ey na yalle yelwe, eul ey ellài an yeni”.
Or the so-called “contracted sentences”, such as “Lan ailare nal eralya, nal ailare lan eralya” ( = Reflecting light generates darkness as well as reflecting darkness generates light) which can become “Lannal ailare, nallan eralya” !!!
You need to think like a Farya and to live a million years to use it like a native speaker…
Anyway, the last custom of the Faryel I’d like to mention is maybe the most important: dreaming together while sitting in circles. Creating mental visions to which every member of a circle add something, which then become stories (even long stories, lasting days) to which everyone adds something.
I’ve been told this has gone as far as creating “beta universes” at times.
Why they do it? Well… I suppose it’s because they can (and even the Eldar can, but the Faryel are FAR, really FAR better).
I’d like to leave you with a Farya day song I remember hearing from a small red-haired woman, clad in white, standing in the veranda of her small stone house, which looked out onto green meadows…


 

Below are the words, which I could never translate or whose meaning I don’t remember:

Ey-ónnu-è,
ey-ennu-alimar-en,
ey-ennu-andu-yaane…

Ey-ennu-ál,
ey-nenu-mallya-len,
yut’elu ye-miryane…

Yuta yanne nenimor anemir,
yuta yel’ ni-aane.
Dlana minne metimar èluma,
ennor andu-yaane.

Te-naila-mìl,
te-naila-è,
te-naila-innu-aane.

Minnu-en,
minnu-lìnuma,
celarya-mindu-vaane.

Mèta yunne nenimor anemir,
mèta tindu shaane.
Lyulle curya veltar elima,
mendor ónnu-aane.

Ey-onnu-è,
ey-ennu-alimar-en,
ey-ennu-andu-yaane…

Ey-ennu-ál,
ey-nenu-mallya-len,
yut’elu ye-miryane…


 
Our myths may be misguided, but they steer however shakily towards the true harbour, while materialistic 'progress' leads only to a yawning abyss and the Iron Crown of the power of evil. (J.R.R. Tolkien)
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Re: The Faryel and their culture

Post by Mildir »

Two more interesting facts about their language: the Faryel call Eru Ilúvatar Anu, which is also the name people gave to God in Mesopotamia.
And I discovered that Varda's name in Farya is Iri.

 
Our myths may be misguided, but they steer however shakily towards the true harbour, while materialistic 'progress' leads only to a yawning abyss and the Iron Crown of the power of evil. (J.R.R. Tolkien)
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Re: The Faryel and their culture

Post by Meneldur Olvarion »

Mildir wrote: Tue Mar 16, 2021 10:47 pm [...] A very important thing about the Farya culture: when they don’t sing they rarely communicate by voice.
This happens for two reasons:
a) Communicating with the mind is an ability they have even as children, it is the most normal thing.
b) Their language… we’ve come to the moment that I must speak about it… their language was originally devised to be dreamt of only.
And preferably to be sung rather than spoken.
Why is that, you may ask ?[/font][/size]
Every word in Farya can have different meanings: its meaning can depend on many factors, such as whether it’s told to a loved one or not, whether it’s placed in front of a word that evokes something smooth or not...
But what's most befuddling is that - if I understood correctly - the meaning of words can also depend on particular thoughts underlying them.

This part in itself isn't that hard for me to understand: it's basically how I think internally, although since I can't sing in any manner other than that which probably sounds like a cross between a small Tiger and and human drunk, I just forego that and use the underlying datastream itself; but, that only works when you are considering your own thoughts, not for communication. Although if current human cybernetic technology were more advanced, it might be interesting to have a "singing device" constructed for me.
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